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Buroraj of Jamalpur: A Glimpse Into the Religio-Cultural Scenario of Rural Bengal

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Buroraj of Jamalpur: A Glimpse Into the Religio-Cultural Scenario of Rural Bengal

Posted on 07 February 2017 by admin

Buroraj of Jamalpur: A Glimpse Into the Religio-Cultural Scenario of Rural Bengal

The scope of cultural history of West Bengal is immense. And of course, religion plays a great part in the enrichment of culture. ‘Buroraj’ of Jamalpur might be considered as a glaring example of this statement.

Jamalpur is a little known village in Kalna sub-division of Barddhaman district in West Bengal. To access there you have to get down at Patuli, the nearest railway station on Bandel-Katwa section of the Eastern Railway, and Jamalpur is nearly 10 kilometer from there.

(Please refer the place in the map given as URL http://www.maplandia.com/india/west-bengal/barddhaman/patuli/ )

The coinage of the name ‘Buroraj’ was very simple and interesting. ‘Buro’ of Buroshiva (i.e. Lord Shiva) and ‘raj’ of Dharmaraj (i.e. Lord Yama) were combined to form the name of this new God, ‘Buroraj’.

There is a myth behind the advent of ‘Buroraj’. It is said that there lived a milkman named Jadu Ghosh at the village of Nimdaha. He had a large number of cows and buffaloes which used to graze on the nearby field and jungle everyday. It was discovered that the milk of a cow called Shyamali of the herd was being stolen everyday. But nobody could solve the mystery. The cowboys lost their jobs. At last Jadu himself followed Shyamali and found that it was running towards the jungle of Jamalpur. Then it stopped at a place in the jungle and the milk started to run down from both of its teats like fountains. Being confounded Jadu reported this incident to the local priest, Mr. Madhusudan Chattopadhyay. When Mr. Chattopadhyay went to that place in the jungle, he saw that the milk was being gathered on a stone which is nothing but a phallic symbol of Lord Shiva. On that very night Mr. Chattopadhyay had a dream in which the God ordained him to make arrangements for the puja of Lord Shiva in a very simple way. So it was done. Mr. Chattopadhyay started to worship the stone and Jadu stood watching. Thus began the tradition of the worship of ‘Buroraj’.

‘Buroraj’ is worshipped in the custom like that of Lord Yama. But the idol is of Lord Shiva. The puja of ‘Buroraj’ takes place every year on a full moon day in the month of May, i.e. on the birthday of Lord Buddha. Overnight thousand and thousands of people pour into the place from all over the state to offer their puja. They sacrifice goats in the name of Lord Yama. Thousands of such sacrifices are done on that single day in the vicinity of the temple. Here and there you can see the blood clots of animal sacrifice. People gather with sticks, battle-axes and choppers in small and large groups. These groups fight with each other to take possession of the sacrificed goats. Though it seems nothing but a barbarism today, it was, no doubt, a game of valor in the past.

The temple of ‘Buroraj’ is not made of brick or stone. It is a simple hut thatched with straw. It is said that the God had forbidden to make His temple there. There occurs a fair at Jamalpur during the whole month of the puja of ‘Buroraj’. Businessmen and artisans come from Kolkata, Nabadwip, Krishnagar, Barddhaman, Katwa, Kalna, Shantipur and many other places of West Bengal. They don’t even get proper shelter. But here there is no narrowness, no poverty of mind. Juxtaposition and compromise are there between two Gods, i.e. Lord Shiva and Lord Yama, between Brahmins and other castes, between peace and animal sacrifice. ‘Buroraj’ is nothing but a symbol of generosity devoid of prejudice and at the same time, an icon of Bengal’s own religion of man.

Written by pinakighosh

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Useful animals

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Useful animals

Posted on 01 August 2016 by admin

Useful animals

Meat, eggs, milk, honey, silk, lac, wool and leather are some products we get from animals. We also use animals to do farm work and transport goods and people. Animals reared for such work are called draught animals.

The extra of animals has been used traditionally to make manure and dung cakes. Now it is used to make biogas, which is used as a fuel and to generate electricity.

The animals we keep for the useful products they give us are called livestock. The rearing of animals on large scale is thus called livestock farming. It is also called anima husbandry. The proper management of feed, shelter and health are the most important aspects of animal husbandry.

The feed given to animals must be nutritious and contain adequate amounts of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, minerals and vitamins. The amount and mix of nutrients are worked out according to the age and health o the animal, and the work done by it. The work done by an animal includes the production of food. Cattle, including cows, buffaloes and bullocks, naturally feed on greases and leaves. They are also given special feeds called concentrates, which include oil cakes, cereals, grams and bran. Fodder plants, like elephant grass, guinea grass, Sudan grass and berseem, are also grown to feed cattle.

Goats and sheep feed on grass and farm waste. In addition, they are given food supplements, like grains, grams and oil cakes. Pigs are generally given a low –fiber feed consisting of cereals and vegetables. Poultry feeds include mashed cereals, groundnut cake, and fish meal and meat meal, prepared from the waste generated in the processing of fish and meat.

All farm animals are not kept in the same kind of shelter. Cattle, for example, are kept in sheds, which are divided into stalls. Poultry birds are kept n cages made of wire or rooms made of bricks and cement. Sheep and goats are kept in open yards, which are fenced off and have a covered area to provide protection from the rain. A pigsty is usually an enclosed yard with a shed.

In general, the following points must be kept in mind while making and managing an animal shelter.

a)      It must get enough sunlight and air.

b)      It must be kept clean and dry. The excreta of the animals must be cleaned out regularly.

c)      It must not be overcrowded.

d)      It must protect the animals from the rain, cold and severe heat, it must also protect them from predators.

e)      It must be located away from residential areas and waste disposal sites.

Written by madugundu krishna
Madugundu Krishna English and Telugu writer. Yemmiganur, Hyderabad, India

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Why Vegans Don’t Eat Dairy Products

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Why Vegans Don’t Eat Dairy Products

Posted on 09 July 2016 by admin

Why Vegans Don’t Eat Dairy Products

There are many reasons why vegans choose not to eat dairy products. It’s healthier for humans not to drink milk or eat dairy. Animal cruelty is avoided by avoiding dairy. It is also better for the environment.

Human beings are the only species that drinks the milk of another mammal. Cow’s milk was meant for calves, not humans. This is why the human body sometimes has a hard time processing milk, cheese, and other dairy products. Dairy allergies and lactose intolerance are some examples of the human body rejecting cow’s milk. Symptoms that can be caused by dairy consumption range from skin rashes and allergies, to bloody stools and arthritis-like symptoms. Not everyone will have these symptoms. Some people are more tolerant of dairy products.

Another reason vegans avoid dairy is because it is better for the environment. Cows produce methane gas, which contributes to global warming. The more beef and dairy cows there are on the planet, the more this effects the atmosphere. The raising of livestock also creates a lot of waste products, feces and urine, which have to be deposited in special landfills. These waste products contaminate the air and water nearby. Cows also use a lot of land, for grazing and for the growing of feed. This contributes to the deforestation in the Amazon and other places. If there were less of a demand for dairy and beef, there would be fewer cows bred for these purposes, and the effect on the environment would be lessened.

The most obvious reason that vegans avoid dairy is animal cruelty. Typically dairy cows don’t have a lot of room to move around, and are forced to produce more milk each day than nature intended. They are given hormones to increase milk production, which enlarges their udders and often leads to infections. Dairy cows are impregnated yearly to keep their milk flowing. The calves are removed from their mothers and not typically allowed to nurse. The male calves are usually raised and slaughtered for beef or slaughtered for veal. When a dairy cow starts to produce less milk, she is slaughtered for beef, usually after three or four years, although the life expectancy of a cow is around 25 years.

There are many reasons for vegans to avoid eating dairy products. Luckily there are plenty of alternatives to dairy foods. Soy milk or rice milk can replace cow’s milk. There are also almond, cashew, and oat milks. There are soy versions of sour cream, ice cream, yogurt, and cheese available in stores. A few cheese substitutes are also soy-free. In addition to that there are cookbooks and websites with recipes for dairy-free cheeses and other dairy alternatives. It is easier now than it has ever been to give up dairy products.
 

Written by SnowyOwl

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The Ten Dirtiest-Looking Animals

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The Ten Dirtiest-Looking Animals

Posted on 22 May 2016 by admin

The Ten Dirtiest-Looking Animals

Many animals look clean and tidy although they seldom take a bath and some animals still look dirty even they

always take a bath while others seem comfortable being nasty. It is their nature being dirty.

1. African Buffalo (Syncerus caffer)

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The large and nasty-looking African Buffalo is highly dangerous to humans due to its unpredictable nature. This

African bovid can grow up to 1.7 meters high and 3.4 meters long. It is also informally called Affalo or Cape

Buffalo.

2. American Bison (Bison bison)

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The American Bison is closely related to the Wisent or European Bison. It has a shaggy, long, dark brown winter

coat, and a lighter weight, lighter brown summer coat. The heads and forequarters are massive, and both sexes

have short, curved horns, which they use in fighting for status within the herd and for defense.

3. Wild Boar (Sus scrofa)

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The dirty-looking Wild Boar that seems to enjoy much being in muddy places is the wild ancestor of the domestic

pig. It is native across much of Central Europe the Mediterranean Region and much of Asia. It is also commonly

called as Wild Hog or simply referred to as Boar.

4. Wisent (Bison bonasus)

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Wisents, Europe’s heaviest surviving land animal, are now forest-dwelling. Aside from humans, they have few

predators with only scattered reports from the 1800s of wolf and bear and predation. It is also known as the Zubr

or European bison.

5. Vulture

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Vultures are well known as scavenging birds. They feed mostly on the carcasses of dead animals making them

one of the dirtiest-looking animals. They are found in Asia, Africa, Australia and the Americas.

6. Mangalitsa

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The Mangalitsa of Hungary which is known also as a Curly-hair Hog. This breed of pig is distinguished by its rich

and curly coat, which can be blond, black and rarely red. Blond Mangalitsa is the most common and popular. The

breed is admirably hardy and adaptable to mountain feeding and low temperatures. It is also extremely disease

and stress resistant. They can also be found in the Balkans.

7. Rhinoceros

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There are five species of Rhinoceros or Rhino – two are native to Africa and three to southern Asia –Javan,

Sumatran and Black Rhino. The Asian species are critically endangered. The Rhinos on the above picture are

Black Rhinoceros.

8. Wild Yak

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The Wild Yak which inhabits mountains and plateaus are well adapted to high altitude. It has larger lungs and

heart compared to cattle found at lower altitudes, as well as greater capacity for transporting oxygen through their

blood. Wild Yaks secrete a special sticky substance in their sweat which helps keep their under-hair matted and

acts as extra insulation. This secretion is used in traditional Nepalese medicine. Wild Yaks are now vulnerable

because they are killed for food by the Tibetans.

9. Spotted Hyena (Crocuta crocuta)

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It’s not surprising to know that Hyenas look dirty because they are scavengers. The Spotted Hyena of Africa is the

largest of all Hyenas. Though often labeled incorrectly as a scavenger, as shown on the above photo, the spotted

hyena is actually a powerful hunter, the majority of its nourishment being derived from live prey. It is also known

as the Laughing Hyena, Cape Wolf or Tiger Wolf.

10. Domestic sheep (Ovis aries)

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It’s quite surprising but the Domestic Sheep which is one of the major providers of wool is one of the dirtiest-

looking animals in the world. It is one of the earliest animals to be domesticated for agricultural purposes raised

for fleece, meat and milk. Sheep continue to be important for wool and meat today numbering a little over 1 billion.

Hope you have had a wonderful time reading this. Thanks!

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Written by BrenNolasco

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We get energy to work and play from carbohydrates and fats

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We get energy to work and play from carbohydrates and fats

Posted on 27 March 2016 by admin

buffalo milk
by bmann

We get energy to work and play from carbohydrates and fats

Health food

Food comes from two main source- plants and animals

Food that has nutrients is called nutritious food. Nutritious food is good for us.

Nutritious food helps us stay healthy. It nourishes our body and mind. It’s important that we get all the nutrients in the correct amount. That’s why we should eat a balanced diet.

A balanced diet contains a lot of fruits and vegetables. A balanced diet includes food from all the three groups; energy-giving, body-building and protective foods. It contains proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins and minerals in the right amount.

Water is also an important part of our diet. Water helps us to digest our food. We should try and drink at least 6-8 glass of water every day.

Importance of food

The food that we eat contains nutrients. Nutrients are substance which our body needs to live and grow.

Our body works all the time, so it needs energy. We get this energy from foods like rice, potatoes, sugar and bread. These foods contain an important nutrient called carbohydrate.

Food like butter, ghee, nuts and oil also give our body energy. They contain a nutrient called fat.

Foods which contain carbohydrates or fats and so give our body energy are called energy- giving foods.

We get energy to work and play from carbohydrates and fats.

Some foods like fish, milk, eggs, and pulses help our body to grow and stay healthy; they contain a nutrient called protein. Proteins also help to repair our body. When we are hurt, cut or bruise ourselves or if we have an accident, proteins help those injuries to heal. These foods are known as body-building foods.

Some foods protect our body from diseases and keep us healthy. Foods like green leafy vegetables, fruit and milk are protective foods. These foods contain vitamins and minerals that protect our body.

Food helps our body to grow and gives us energy to work and play. Food also helps us to fight diseases. The food we eat comes from different sources.

We get vegetables and fruits from plants. Hens give us eggs. Cows, buffaloes and goats give us milk.

Written by madugundu krishna
Madugundu Krishna English and Telugu writer. Yemmiganur, Hyderabad, India

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Animals with the Weirdest and Unique Horns

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Animals with the Weirdest and Unique Horns

Posted on 02 March 2016 by admin

buffalo milk
by ILRI

Animals with the Weirdest and Unique Horns

A horn is a pointed projection of the skin on the head of various mammals, consisting of a covering of horn (keratin and other proteins) surrounding a core of living bone. True horns are found only among the ruminant artiodactyls, in the families Antilocapridae and Bovidae. These animals have one or occasionally two pairs of horns, which usually have a curved or spiral shape, often with ridges or fluting. In many species only the males have horns. Horns start to grow soon after birth, and continue to grow throughout the life of the animal (except in pronghorns, which shed the outer layer annually, but retain the bony core).

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One creature with the weirdest horn in the world is a bull named Lurch. According to the Guinness Book of Records, he is the bull with the largest horn circumference in the world, measuring 37.5 inches.

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This is a goat with unique and handsome horns – spiral horns. Domestic goats are scientifically called Capra aegagrus hircus. They are raise for their meat, milk, hair and skins.  Domestic goats are one of the oldest domesticated species. n the last century, they have also gained some popularity as pets.

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This is a ram with two pairs of horns. A ram is an uncastrated male sheep. Sheep are one of the earliest animals to be domesticated for agricultural purposes. They are raised for fleece, meat (lamb or mutton) and milk. A sheep’s wool is the most widely used of any animal, and is usually harvested by shearing.

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Here’s another sheep with unique horns, this one has four horns.

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This mammal is definitely one creature with weird horns. This animal is called the pronghorn or scientifically known as Antilocapra Americana, it is also called pronghorn antelope or prong buck, a species of ungulate mammal native to interior western North America.  It is the only surviving member of the family Antilocapridae.

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Not only mammals have horns, some insects also do. The Atlas beetle, Chalcosoma atlas, is a species of beetle with horns. They are found in southern Asia, especially Malaysia, remarkable for their size (25-130 mm). As common in many insect species, the male is larger than the female and usually two males will fight for a female for mating.

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Another insect with a distinct horn-like object is the Lucanus cervus, the best-known species of stag beetle and is sometimes referred to simply as the stag beetle. Once quite common, the population of the Lucanus cervus, along with that of other species of beetles which feed on wood, is in steep decline, and is now listed as a globally threatened/declining species.

Here’s an additional list of mammals with weird and unique pair of horns.

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A deer on display in a museum has one of the most peculiar horns. This animal seems to suffer from some sort of horn disease.

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A water buffalo or carabao with distinctively unique pair of horns.

Look at those horns. This is a deer with weird horns. See image here.

Animals have a variety of uses for horns and antlers, including defending themselves from predators and fighting members of their own species for territory, dominance or mating priority. In addition, horns may be used to root in the soil or strip bark from trees. In animal courtship many use horns in displays. Some animals with true horns use them for cooling. The blood vessels in the bony core allow the horns to function as a radiator.

For more amazing and animal-related articles see

15 Amazing Animals From Around the World
World’s Most Expensive Animals
Top 15 Most Venomous Cobras in the World
The Most Beautifully and Uniquely Colored Mammals in the World
World’s Most Colorful, Beautiful and Poisonous Frogs
12 Animals with the Longest Lifespan in the World
12 Animals and Their Bizarre Habits and Traits
Temporary and Permanent Cave Dwellers
The “Ships of the Desert”
World’s Most Venomous Mammals
Bizarre Sleeping Habits of Animals
Amazing Animals and Their Unique (while Sometimes Bizarre) Traits
15 Simply Amazing Animals

Written by nobertbermosa
I am a Secondary School Head Teacher III and currently enrolled for my doctorate degree at Araullo University. I also contribute to Triond and Factoid

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